Ethical Decision Making Model

ethical-decision-making-model

Photo by Anne Nygård on Unsplash

Ethical Decision Making Model

Whenever you make a decision, you want your decision to be ethical—in other words, you want to always use an ethical decision making model.

Why, you might ask?

Because you want to make the most strategic decisions consistently—don’t you?

FIRST

This is about the quality of your decision

Please, let me ask you:

What is the main ingredient in good decision-making?

The answer to this question is critical, isn’t it?

Do you know what is the main ingredient in good decision-making?

If you don’t know the answer to this question … you better grab this answer and glue it on your forehead, because you are going need it for the rest of your managerial life:

The main ingredient in good decision-making is information.

Now …

When your decision is ethical, you are much more likely to engage all your team members in your decision making process; and by doing so, you are much more likely to get their different perspectives, insights, know-how, etc., for the benefit of your decision’s quality.

But when your decision is not ethical—when you don’t use an ethical decision making model—you are much less likely to get all this wealth of different viewpoints, angles, data, etc. Hence, harming the quality of your decision.

SECOND

This is about the execution effectiveness of your decision

When your decision is ethical, you are much more likely to involve the minds and hearts of your team members (the people who will execute such decision); simply because they all know that such decision is in the best interest of all of you.

On the contrary, when your decision is not ethical—when you don’t use an ethical decision-making model—your team members are less likely to commit to such decision; in other words, they are less likely to take responsibility for its execution (you diminish the execution effectiveness of your unethical decision).

THIRD

This is about your results

When your decision is ethical, your decision tends to be aligned with your team’s results.

Your performance as a manager is assessed by your results—and your results must be aligned 100 per cent with your team’s strategy. When you reach your team’s results, every member of the team wins.

However, when your decision is not ethical—when you don’t use an ethical decision-making model—it means that your decision is aligned with your particular self-serving interests, but not with your team’s results (harming your performance).

Ethical Decision Making Model

For clarity sake, let me recapitulate:

Your decision-making success depends on both on your decision’s quality and on your execution effectiveness.

Your decision’s quality depends on diversity of ideas (information).

And the execution effectiveness of such decision depends on your team members’ commitment for its execution.

HENCE …

If you make an ethical decision, you are much more likely to be successful in a sustainable way … in the long run.

One more time (this is one more argument), win-win relationships are the foundation for long-term sustainable success. 

But if you make an unethical decision, you are much less likely to be successful in a sustainable way … in the long run.

Unfortunately, I still hear here and there—without me asking—about leaders making unethical decisions; even inside world-class organizations that you and I know (?)

Unreal.

Go figure …