Employee Goal Setting

employee-goal-setting

Employee Goal Setting

Do you want to make your employee goal setting comprehensive and strategic? Look no further.

Once in a while—or perhaps rather often—you must set goals for the team you lead, mustn’t you?

And these goals—the goals that you set—they better be comprehensive and strategic. Isn’t this true?

Wouldn’t you love to have an employee goal setting process to help you set comprehensive and strategic goals for your direct reports, consistently?

Well … you are in luck, because I am going to pass on to you an elegant and simple process that I learned from Christopher Rauen and Friedman Schulz von Thun (1)

 

EMPLOYEE GOAL SETTING

FIRST STEP

The fist step in this employee goal setting process is to come up with three or four perspectives that are relevant to your business situation.

SECOND STEP

The second step is to come up with three or more questions for each perspective.

THIRD STEP

The third step in this employee goal setting process is to look at each one of your direct reports’ goals, through the lens of each one of your questions.

Asking yourself these questions in light of each one of your direct reports’ goals will allow you to look at each goal from different perspectives.

These perspectives will allow you think about other possibilities, perhaps polishing the goal, and/or changing the goal, and/or coming up with an entirely new goal.

The idea is to use different perspectives—and questions in each perspective—to help you make your direct reports’ goals as comprehensive and strategic as possible.

 

EMPLOYEE GOAL SETTING EXAMPLE

FIRST STEP

The fist step in this employee goal setting process is to come up with three or four perspectives that are relevant to your business situation.

As an example, I am arbitrarily showing you the four perspectives that Christopher Rauen and Friedman Schulz von Thun suggest:

  1. The business perspective
  2. The technology perspective
  3. Your direct reports perspective
  4. Your own perspective

I repeat: You may use these perspectives and/or you may come up with your own perspectives, more suitable for your specific business circumstances.

SECOND STEP

The second step is to come up with three or more questions for each perspective.

Here is an example:

From the business perspective:

  • What are my key performance indicators?
  • What is my budget?
  • What is this goal’s ROI?
  • Etc.

From the technical perspective:

  • How are the global trends in my industry going to impact this goal?
  • How will my direct report get technical support to accomplish this goal?
  • Will my customers’ requirements change in the next 6-12 months?
  • Etc.

From your direct reports’ perspective:

  • Is this goal aligned with my direct report’s wants and needs?
  • Does my direct report have all the necessary competencies to reach this goal?
  • How can I best support my direct report with this goal?
  • Etc.

From my your own personal perspective

  • Does the team I lead have all the necessary resources to support my direct report with this goal?
  • Do I know everything I need to know, in regards to this goal?
  • What will I personally get when my direct report accomplishes this goal?
  • Etc.

PLEASE NOTE

You may use these perspectives and these questions as they are, and/or you may add your own, and/or you may change them, etc.

This process is flexible and you can adapt it to meet your specific needs, depending on your particular circumstances.

In other words, these perspectives and these questions are meant to get your imagination going.

What I want to give you is NOT so much these perspectives and these questions—but rather—I want to give you the concept behind these perspectives and these questions, so that you end up with your own employee goal setting process.

THIRD STEP

Now that you have your own perspectives, and your questions for each perspective, all you want to do is to run each one of your direct report’s goals through each one of your questions.

Asking yourself these questions will allow you to see your goal (the goal you are trying to set for your direct report) from different perspectives.

These different perspectives will broaden your individual view of the environment within which your direct report must reach such goal, and the resources that will help your direct report achieve it.

In other words, doing so will help you broaden your perspective in regards to such goal, allowing you to make it as comprehensive and as strategic as possible.

IMPORTANT

You may write your goals first, and then you may go through this three-step employee goal setting process second.

Or you may go through this three-step process first, and then you may write your goals second.

Or play with it, and use a combination of both—whatever works best for you.

 

Critical Next Step

Once you have set all the individual goals for your direct reports, your next step is to put all those goals on steroids, to escalate the likelihood that your direct reports will actually reach them.

To do so, take a look at the three goal setting guidelines; these three guidelines are mandatory for each goal—they are a must—they are definitely NOT optional.

 

CONCLUSION

Information is the main ingredient in good decision-making—and a broad perspective is key information.

In your employee goal setting process, use different perspectives and different questions to help you set comprehensive and strategic goals consistently. 

 

REFERENCE

(1) I am using the four perspectives from the “Inner Leadership Team” that Christopher Rauen developed in “Coaching-Tools III” (managerSeminare Verlag, Bonn, NRW: 2012) from the model, “The Inner Team” that Friedman Schulz von Thun created in “Miteinander” (Rowohlt Taschenbuch Verlag GmbH: 2009)